UW Gender & Women's Studies Librarian

Providing intersectional resources on gender, women, and feminism to the University of Wisconsin System and beyond since 1977.

71,067 notes &

To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”

This invisibility is political.

Michael S. Kimmel, in the introduction to the book, “Privilege: A Reader”  (via rosaparking)

(Source: thinkspeakstress, via femblr)

6 notes &

Aliya Mustafina

importantwomensbirthdays:

Aliya Mustafina was born on September 30, 1994 in Yegoryevsk, Russia. At the 2012 London Olympics, Mustafina won four medals in gymnastics, including a gold medal for the uneven bars. She has also won eight medals at the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships, and nine medals at the European Women’s Artistic Gymnastics Championships.

Happy birthday, Aliya Mustafina!

(via turningpointsinwomenshistory)

47 notes &

Signal Boost: Over the Rainbow Committee needs members!

kellymce:

**Please reblog!!**

For the past three years, I’ve been part of the American Library Association GLBT Roundtable’s Over the Rainbow committee. I’m currently the chair. This committee exists to create a bibliography of queer books for adults that come out every year, to help librarians doing collection development. They are recruiting new members to start in January 2015. 

The truth: if you join this committee, you will be inundated with review copies of gay books. Many of them are faaaaaantastic. Some of them will make you cry or pee your pants laughing. Some of them will not be your cup of tea. Still, serving on this committee is an opportunity to make queer voices more visible in libraries, and also to see the variety of queer books being published. It is also a way to get involved in ALA or the GLBTRT, if that’s something you’re into. 

If you’re interested in applying, the details are here, the deadline is October 15. You do need to be a member of ALA, and of the GLBTRT. It’s a two-year commitment. It is highly encouraged for you to come to Midwinter, but you can also attend virtually, if you don’t make it in person. I am happy to talk with anyone who is considering applying. Not gonna lie, you have to read A LOT, but if you already read a lot of queer books, why not? 

**Please reblog!!**

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

23 notes &

52 Powerful Women-Tattoo Artists

turningpointsinwomenshistory:

Art comes in many forms. One of the more beautiful, and sometimes controversial, forms being as tattoos. Tattoos and their artists possess unique skills of artistic expression. Yet, since their advent, tattoos have been inked into male skin by men and men only. That was only until around 1904, when Maud Wagner started inking. Behold her, in all of her tatted glory. So beautiful.

image

Wagner is recognized as the first known female tattoo artist from the U.S. She got her start as a circus aerialist at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition where she met tattoo artist Gus Wagner, one of the first professional tattoo artists in the U.S. Intrigued by his trade, Maud traded Gus a romantic date for a lesson in tattooing. This resulted in their marriage and launched Maud’s tattoo career.

 She apprenticed for her husband and learned the “hand-poke”, otherwise known as the stick ‘n’ poke method. (In case you’re wondering, it’s exactly as it sounds.) The Wagners took their talents on the road and brought the art of tattoos to the central U.S.

You see, tattoos at this time were meant for sailors and sailors ONLY. This meant that there wasn’t much of a demand or knowledge of tattoos inland of coastal ports. Furthermore the whole stick ‘n’ poke approach was arduous, dangerous, and not as complex as the work we see today.

What’s impressive about Maud Wagner is that she was a tattooed woman during the early 20th century. Wagner was a woman who used her body to express herself during a time when women didn’t even have the right to vote. Women couldn’t even show their ankles without inciting criticism. 

Today, there are male and female tattoo artists from around the world. Tattoos are a growing part of the cultural scene thanks to early work from the Wagners and other pioneering tattooists.  

Until next week. 

Filed under maud wagner tattoo artist women history turningpoints women's history wednesday

1,944 notes &

smartgirlsattheparty:

huffingtonpost:

10 Gorgeous Quotes From Banned Books (IMAGES)

When banned books come to mind, it’s easy to imagine bonfires full of burning pages. Banned books would seem to be the stuff of darker days and drearier times — but banned books are not a thing of the past.

For more stunning photos and quotes from books go here. 

LOVE. 

Filed under amypoehlersmartgirls banned books week bannedbooksweek huffington post huffpostbooks Banned Books ALA american library association tumblarians

107 notes &

ppaction:

This generation is the largest and most diverse in recent history, and has the power to move us forward this November. And there’s never been more at stake for the issues that matter to young people: voting rights, education, immigration, the environment, reproductive rights, and beyond.
Elections matter, and if you don’t participate, you can’t complain. Don’t miss out on the chance to stand up for the issues you care about: Register, spread the word, and vote! 
NationalVoterRegistrationDay.org

ppaction:

This generation is the largest and most diverse in recent history, and has the power to move us forward this November. And there’s never been more at stake for the issues that matter to young people: voting rights, education, immigration, the environment, reproductive rights, and beyond.

Elections matter, and if you don’t participate, you can’t complain. Don’t miss out on the chance to stand up for the issues you care about: Register, spread the word, and vote! 

NationalVoterRegistrationDay.org

(via wertheyouth)